Help with Italian translation: 1877 birth register

I have located my g-grandfather’s birth registration in Italy – Salvatore Pasquale Philippe GIARDINA was born in 1877 in Cefalu, Palermo, Sicily, Italy, the son of Rosario and Concettina GIARDINA.

I have transcribed parts of this document but when you combine handwriting [scribble?] with a foreign language it becomes a tad more difficult.

I’d really appreciate input from anyone who can help.  If you click on the thumbnail image you can view an enlargement.

My transcription / translation so far using Following the paper trail: a multilingual translation guide, Google translate and an Italian dictionary …

Birth certificates
Number 392
Giardina Salvatore Pasquale Philippo

In the year eighteen seventy seven on the  … day of December at nine a.m. at the Town Hall.

Before me Guiseppe … … …  … … the registrar of vital statistics of the town of Cefalu.

Appeared before me Rosario Giardina aged 30, mariner residing in Cefalu, who declared to me that at the hour of 10 a.m. on the fifth day of the current month, in the house situated on the via …, to Concetta Giardina … … … … … … was born a baby of the male sex, she presented to me and to which she gave the name of Salvatore Pasquale Phillipo.

To the above and to this document the following were present as witnesses: Salvatore ….., aged thirty, farmer, and … … aged forty, … [occupation] both living in this town.  … … … … … … … … … … [to end].

As I said, any assistance with filling in the gaps would be much appreciated, as would any “local” knowledge of Cefaul.  I was interested to note on a map a “street” along the waterfront called “Lungomare Guiseppe Giardina” [Promenade Joseph Giardina]  Occupations listed in various documents for Salvatore and Rosario GIARDINA include mariner, fisherman, seaman – is there a family connection?

The more you find … the more questions you have!

About Susie Zada
It really doesn't matter if it's Local History or Family History [genealogy] - I just love it ... Susie Zada

3 Responses to Help with Italian translation: 1877 birth register

  1. Susie Zada says:

    Thank you to Rhain for this updated translation …

    Birth certificates
    Number 392
    Giardina Salvatore Pasquale Philippo

    In the year eighteen seventy seven on the sixth day of December at nine a.m. at the Town Hall.

    Before me Guiseppe … ?Alsefiore? [title] the registrar of vital statistics of the town of Cefalu.

    Appeared before me Rosario Giardina aged 30, mariner residing in Cefalu, who declared to me that at the hour of 10 a.m. on the fifth day of the current month, in the house situated on the via Largoteatro, to Concetta Giardina his wife and a local resident was born a baby of the male sex, she presented the baby to me and to which she gave the name of Salvatore Pasquale Phillipo.

    To the above and to this document the following were present as witnesses: Salvatore Serio, aged thirty, farmer, and ?Gefario Culotta?, aged forty, industrialist both living in this town. Below this document those present who witnessed the events have signed, with the exception of those who gave verbal witness as they are illiterate.

  2. Debbie Halley says:

    Thank you for posting this! I have an 1880 Italian birth record just like this one that I needed help on. This really helped me alot.

  3. Susie Zada says:

    Hi Debbie,

    I’m so glad this helped – I’m not sure where you’re located but a book that you might find REALLY helpful is – Following the Paper Trail: A multilingual translation guide – larger libraries, genealogical societies, and university libraries might be a good place to look.

    I just checked and there are second-hand copies on Amazon and AbeBooks and I’m sure a few others. I have German, French and Swiss as well as Italian in my family so it’s a fabulous reference book. It also includes Swedish, Latin, Portuguese, Romanian, Spanish, Czech, Polish, Russian, Hungarian and Lithuanian sections.

    And don’t forget Google Translate – getting better and better.

    Also there are some great Facebook pages now with people offering to help with translations.

    All the best with your research. … Susie Z

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